Photo
ce-sac-contient:

Pierre Soulages - Peinture, 21 novembre 1959
Oil on canvas (195 x 130cm) 

ce-sac-contient:

Pierre Soulages - Peinture, 21 novembre 1959

Oil on canvas (195 x 130cm) 

(via chadwys)

Photoset

1000drawings:

sad ghost club  by Lize meddings

David, I thought you’d like this.

(via heavyxboots)

Photo
terriblerealestateagentphotos:

Part of a modern art installation entitled “Things are looking up”.
Follow on Twitter @BadRealtyPhotos

terriblerealestateagentphotos:

Part of a modern art installation entitled “Things are looking up”.

Follow on Twitter @BadRealtyPhotos

Photo
hammeroutdesign:

Hammer Out Design
Photo
nevver:

A little push
Photo
wetreesinart:

Koloman Moser (Autr. 1866-1918), Bois de pins en hiver, vers 1907, huile sur toile, 55,5 x 45,5 cm, Vienne,  Musée du Belvédère

Again with the snow crushing, but there’s something more to this one than just the snow and the beautiful way it was painted. It’s doing something for me. There’s a stillness and quiet that you can feel in those trees. 

wetreesinart:

Koloman Moser (Autr. 1866-1918), Bois de pins en hiver, vers 1907, huile sur toile, 55,5 x 45,5 cm, Vienne,  Musée du Belvédère

Again with the snow crushing, but there’s something more to this one than just the snow and the beautiful way it was painted. It’s doing something for me. There’s a stillness and quiet that you can feel in those trees. 

(via cavetocanvas)

Photoset

myimaginarybrooklyn:

citizendev:

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/features/mummy-i-could-have-done-that—new-book-pokes-fun-at-modern-art-9112523.html

This has popped up on my dash a few times and I’ve enjoyed it. Then one morning, Billy texted me a link to it. He seemed very pleased to share it, and I didn’t know what to make of the whole matter. Art is weird. (?)

(via hootcat)

Photoset

exhibition-ism:

Alex Roulette's strange and surreal oil paintings. 

I saw these, thought to myself that I liked them but that I’m not usually too partial to collage art, and then saw that they’re paintings. Yes please. I guess I’m a bit biased.

(via painted-fire)

Photo

Forest by Wilhelm Sasnal (2003)Oil on Canvas, 45 x 45cm (18 x 18in)

I feel that I need to see work like this sometimes. Every once in awhile, I have a particular piece that crosses my path that just says that I need to reconsider a previous way of thinking. This is one of those paintings. 

Forest by Wilhelm Sasnal (2003)
Oil on Canvas, 45 x 45cm (18 x 18in)

I feel that I need to see work like this sometimes. Every once in awhile, I have a particular piece that crosses my path that just says that I need to reconsider a previous way of thinking. This is one of those paintings. 

(Source: grubers, via painted-fire)

Photo
nevver:

Do other people’s thoughts chase them through the trees
Photo
chicagogeek:

The Chicago Junior School (to provide a home and education for children from broken homes and to inspire them with ideals of right living); Elgin, Illinois; 1923.
Currently on the 2012 list of Ten Most Endangered Historic Places in Illinois.

This place, and the years spent here, are largely responsible for making me the person I am today. 
My brother and I both started here as preschoolers. My family had a home in Elgin, IL, and we were enrolled there until we lost that house and moved for a brief time to Richmond, IL. My brother and I weren’t happy during the brief time we spent in the Richmond schools, so my mom and dad, while navigating the beginning of a messy divorce, made sacrifices to get us back to Elgin to enroll at CJS. 
My mom started working at the school, and we moved in to one of the dorm rooms, which allowed my parents to keep us there. I don’t know what sort of hoops they had to jump to afford the tuition, but I am endlessly grateful to both of them for the time spent there. My mom worked as a dorm mother, preschool teacher, and after-school daycare provider all while participating in church organizations and keeping us busy and entertained. 
We were the only family that lived on campus. That meant that the hours after-school, the weekends, and summers were a bit lonely, but my brother and I occupied ourselves with spending a large portion of it outdoors, exploring the woods of the campus and all the history buried in them. The time not spent on the campus was filled with driving around the greater Fox River Valley area to be with friends, family and participate in many YMCA, church and community based activities. I was in plays, took sports lessons, went to my first art classes, and spent large swaths of time with my younger brother and three younger cousins. My parents allowed us all of the opportunities we could have asked for. 
I would have been called a “lifer” (enrolled pre-8th), but my dad had worked hard enough to afford a home in Lake in the Hills, IL. The summer between fifth grade and sixth grade, we moved out of our mother’s home at the school, and moved in with our dad, at which point I started at a public school. My mom continued working at the school while living in various places. We would spend many weekends there with her while she worked as the dorm mother for the students who lived there during the school year. 
The love I felt for the school never went away, and I had the chance to work there for a year during the beginning of my years in college as an after-school daycare provider. I felt this sense of ownership and pride for the education the kids were getting just as I had received previously. 
The school closed shortly after I worked there. My mom, brother and I went back there to visit a few times since it has closed. Most recently, we walked the campus and peeked our heads into buildings when we could, and I took some cherished photographs that I’m hoping will make their way into my work at some point. 
I’ve mentioned the school before when recalling the “Character Building Qualities” that were instilled in us there. Everything about the place sunk in to me. I can’t imagine what sort of person I would be like without the years I spent there. I don’t know that I would want to. 
I sincerely hope they find a good use for the campus that doesn’t include any further destruction of the campus or facilities. 

chicagogeek:

The Chicago Junior School (to provide a home and education for children from broken homes and to inspire them with ideals of right living); Elgin, Illinois; 1923.

Currently on the 2012 list of Ten Most Endangered Historic Places in Illinois.

This place, and the years spent here, are largely responsible for making me the person I am today. 

My brother and I both started here as preschoolers. My family had a home in Elgin, IL, and we were enrolled there until we lost that house and moved for a brief time to Richmond, IL. My brother and I weren’t happy during the brief time we spent in the Richmond schools, so my mom and dad, while navigating the beginning of a messy divorce, made sacrifices to get us back to Elgin to enroll at CJS. 

My mom started working at the school, and we moved in to one of the dorm rooms, which allowed my parents to keep us there. I don’t know what sort of hoops they had to jump to afford the tuition, but I am endlessly grateful to both of them for the time spent there. My mom worked as a dorm mother, preschool teacher, and after-school daycare provider all while participating in church organizations and keeping us busy and entertained. 

We were the only family that lived on campus. That meant that the hours after-school, the weekends, and summers were a bit lonely, but my brother and I occupied ourselves with spending a large portion of it outdoors, exploring the woods of the campus and all the history buried in them. The time not spent on the campus was filled with driving around the greater Fox River Valley area to be with friends, family and participate in many YMCA, church and community based activities. I was in plays, took sports lessons, went to my first art classes, and spent large swaths of time with my younger brother and three younger cousins. My parents allowed us all of the opportunities we could have asked for. 

I would have been called a “lifer” (enrolled pre-8th), but my dad had worked hard enough to afford a home in Lake in the Hills, IL. The summer between fifth grade and sixth grade, we moved out of our mother’s home at the school, and moved in with our dad, at which point I started at a public school. My mom continued working at the school while living in various places. We would spend many weekends there with her while she worked as the dorm mother for the students who lived there during the school year. 

The love I felt for the school never went away, and I had the chance to work there for a year during the beginning of my years in college as an after-school daycare provider. I felt this sense of ownership and pride for the education the kids were getting just as I had received previously. 

The school closed shortly after I worked there. My mom, brother and I went back there to visit a few times since it has closed. Most recently, we walked the campus and peeked our heads into buildings when we could, and I took some cherished photographs that I’m hoping will make their way into my work at some point. 

I’ve mentioned the school before when recalling the “Character Building Qualities” that were instilled in us there. Everything about the place sunk in to me. I can’t imagine what sort of person I would be like without the years I spent there. I don’t know that I would want to. 

I sincerely hope they find a good use for the campus that doesn’t include any further destruction of the campus or facilities. 

Photoset

artruby:

Nicole Dextras.

Those second to last ones resonate the most. I’m crushing hard on snow right now. Probably has something to do with my ongoing homesickness and how long it’s been since I experienced it. With the exception of a freak snowstorm we hit while driving through Denver recently, I haven’t experienced a good snow in a few years, I think. 

Photo
flyingantday:


Andrew Wyeth, The Clearing, 1979.


AWESOME.

flyingantday:

Andrew Wyeth, The Clearing, 1979.

AWESOME.

(via oldpainting)

Photo
iheartmyart:

Tim Noble & Sue Webster, Nihilistic Optimistic, 2012, Neon, transformers 42.4 x 153.6 cm (163/4 x 601/2 in)

"Nihilists! Fuck me. I mean, say what you want about the tenets of National Socialism, Dude, at least it’s an ethos."

iheartmyart:

Tim Noble & Sue Webster, Nihilistic Optimistic, 2012, Neon, transformers 42.4 x 153.6 cm (163/4 x 601/2 in)

"Nihilists! Fuck me. I mean, say what you want about the tenets of National Socialism, Dude, at least it’s an ethos."

Photo
artruby:

Tom Sachs, Untitled, (2013).

Tom Sachs is one of my art gods. I have a list. He’s on it.

artruby:

Tom Sachs, Untitled, (2013).

Tom Sachs is one of my art gods. I have a list. He’s on it.