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nevver:

Hard Core
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I would have liked to go fishing with my Grandpa Howard. I love having these photos to get just a small glimpse into my father’s father’s life. #watercolor #gouache #fishing #wisconsin #greatlakes #myart

I would have liked to go fishing with my Grandpa Howard. I love having these photos to get just a small glimpse into my father’s father’s life. #watercolor #gouache #fishing #wisconsin #greatlakes #myart

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epruitt:

Artist 岳敏君 Yue Minjun

Artist Yue Minjun, b.1962, Heilongjiang Province, China, currently lives and works in Beijing. His paintings and sculptures always feature figures with the same laughing face, modeled on his own as if forever painting a self-portrait. Immediately humorous and light-hearted in appearance, Yue’s paintings are more dark in approach, enquiring one to delve deeper into their own contemplation of existence behind the curtains of cultural norms. Rather than being a source of comfort, the smiles on Yue Minjun’s characters embody not an expression of happiness, but forces the viewer to separate the subject from the norm.

Through his adaptation of pop aesthetics, using both the exaggerated expressiveness of cartooning and the stylistic rendering of graphic illustration, Yue depicts his self-portraits (with contorted toothy grins) to weave in China’s tumultuous recent historical experiences into his works.

By the time Yue graduated in 1989 from Hebei Normal University, China was rocked by student-led demonstrations and their suppression on Tiananmen Square that year. “My mood changed at that time,” he said. “I was very down. I realized the gap between reality and the ideal, and I wanted to create my own artistic definition, whereby there could be a meeting with social life and the social environment.”

“The first step,” he added, “was to create a style to express my feelings accurately, starting with something that I knew really well —myself.” The second step was to devise the laugh, which, he said, was inspired by a painting he saw by another Chinese artist, Geng Jianyi, in which a smile is deformed to mean the opposite of what it normally means.

“So I developed this painting where you see someone laughing,” he said. “At first you think he’s happy, but when you look more carefully, there’s something else there. A smile,” Mr. Yue said, “doesn’t necessarily mean happiness; it could be something else.”

The smile has been variously interpreted as a sort of joke at the absurdity of it all, or the illusion of happiness in lives inevitably heading toward extinction. Karen Smith, a Beijing expert on Chinese art, suggests that Mr. Yue’s grin is a mask for real feelings of helplessness; and Theorist Li Xianting describes Yue’s work as “a self-ironic response to the spiritual vacuum and folly of modern-day China.”

“In China there’s a long history of the smile,” Mr. Yue said. “There is the Maitreya Buddha who can tell the future and whose facial expression is a laugh. Normally there’s an inscription saying that you should be optimistic and laugh in the face of reality. There were also paintings during the Cultural Revolution period, those Soviet-style posters showing happy people laughing,” he continued. “But what’s interesting is that normally what you see in those posters is the opposite of reality.” Mr. Yue said his smile was in a way a parody of those posters. But, since it’s a self-portrait, it’s also ‘necessarily’ a parody of himself, he added. “I’m not laughing at anybody else, because once you laugh at others, you’ll run into trouble, and can create obstacles,” he said. “This is the way to do it if you want to make a parody of the things that are behind the image.”

The real reason he paints himself is that it gives him a greater margin for freedom of expression, he explained. “It’s not a denial of reality but a questioning of it,” Mr. Yue said of his work in general. “And that laugh — anybody who’s gone through Chinese recent experience would understand it.”

“I’m actually trying to make sense of the world. There’s nothing cynical or absurd in what I do.”

A great Interview on Yue entitled: Yue Minjun on his Laughter and Pain

Sources: Saatchi Art | Initial Access | Flickr | wallpaper | Emorfes | New York Times | Wikipedia | CNN Asia

(via louievanpatten)

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I’d like to make this one on a nice,  expansive canvas with oil paint. Getting that gradient in oil instead of gouache would bring me that physical satisfaction that only oil paint seems to do. #gouache #watercolor #myart

I’d like to make this one on a nice, expansive canvas with oil paint. Getting that gradient in oil instead of gouache would bring me that physical satisfaction that only oil paint seems to do. #gouache #watercolor #myart

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First week of my 2nd year of MFA done after a productive and tiring day. I’m finding the whole getting back into the studio life schedule to be very strange after spending so much time doing more physical work all summer. I’m used to having a sore back at the end of the day because I’ve been crawling around on my hands and knees from my home repairs. Now, I have a sore back from sitting still and working hunched over my watercolor set. There must be a happy medium that I can find over the semester. Or maybe yoga? #watercolor #studiolife #gouache #myart

First week of my 2nd year of MFA done after a productive and tiring day. I’m finding the whole getting back into the studio life schedule to be very strange after spending so much time doing more physical work all summer. I’m used to having a sore back at the end of the day because I’ve been crawling around on my hands and knees from my home repairs. Now, I have a sore back from sitting still and working hunched over my watercolor set. There must be a happy medium that I can find over the semester. Or maybe yoga? #watercolor #studiolife #gouache #myart

Photoset

cross-connect:

Artist on tumblr - Julie Sarloutte is a French artist, graduate from the National School of Fine Arts in Paris, France. She focuses on embroidery, but she isn’t making clothes; using string, Sarloutte creates pieces so detailed that they appear to be composed of paint strokes instead of individual stitches. Sarloutte draws inspiration from technology and the media, as her work focuses on what the world news is covering. Omnipresent tragedies such as war, hostages, natural disasters and repression are most often the subjects of her embroideries. She also works with painting and mosaic, every method leading to what she believes is an unexpected contrast between the subject she is portraying and the material it is being made from via

Posted to Cross Connect by Margaret

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visual-poetry:

»secret painting« by mel ramsden
[via]

visual-poetry:

»secret painting« by mel ramsden

[via]

Photoset

7knotwind:

JERRY SALTZ
advice for artists

I keep thinking about #5. Our professor, Samantha Fields, has had this on the wall of the painting studio since she did her manifesto lecture way back when, and #5 in particular pops into my head on a semi regular basis. It’s one of those things that feel like they’re being spoken directly to you. Even if I’m not a super hardcore sports fan, loving the Cubs and the Bears has always sort of been the one “religion” my family could agree on. The exception being  my Dad, who has always been loyal to his Wisconsin teams…I have worn a cheese head hat on more than one occasion while accompanying my dad to games. 

When I doubt my interests or their relevance, or I feel like the only reason something might be interesting to me is that it’s deeply personal in nature, I think of this quote and the scores of other people that probably feel like he is speaking directly to them as well through it. 

(via emilybjones)

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nevver:

Set the woods on fire
Tags: inspiration
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mucksnipe:

Aaron Smith, “Ajax”, 2012, original oil treated paper , 26” x 21.5” 
http://aaronsmithart.com

mucksnipe:

Aaron Smith, “Ajax”, 2012, original oil treated paper , 26” x 21.5” 

http://aaronsmithart.com

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likeafieldmouse:

Teodora Axente - Made of Matter (2012)

(via brittany-crowther)

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(Source: stoicmike, via heavyxboots)

Tags: inspiration
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red-lipstick:


Cityinthesea aka Kel, Kelly (Canada) - Take Me, 2009     Paintings

red-lipstick:

Cityinthesea aka Kel, Kelly (Canada) - Take Me, 2009     Paintings

(Source: cityinthesea.deviantart.com, via heavyxboots)

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sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:
Milton Blas Verano, Milton in Buenos Aires, 2014, Oil, acrylic and collage on paper, 18 x 23 cm
http://www.miltonblasverano.com/

sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:

Milton Blas Verano, Milton in Buenos Aires, 2014, Oil, acrylic and collage on paper, 18 x 23 cm

http://www.miltonblasverano.com/

Photoset

visual-poetry:

by michael pederson

(via miguelmarquezoutside)

(Source: miguelmarquezoutside.com)